Holloway

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The name/s on this page were taken from the 1891 Women's Suffrage Petition. We encourage you to edit this page to add information or make corrections.

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Contents

A Holloway of Bairnsdale

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This person used this address when signing the Women's Suffrage petition in 1891. Log in to edit this section.

E Holloway of Hawthorn

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This person used this address when signing the Women's Suffrage petition in 1891. Log in to edit this section.

F Holloway of College Street Hawthorn

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This person used this address when signing the Women's Suffrage petition in 1891. Log in to edit this section.

Mrs J Holloway of Bellerine Street Geelong

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This person used this address when signing the Women's Suffrage petition in 1891. Log in to edit this section.

J Holloway of Tyntynder

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This person used this address when signing the Women's Suffrage petition in 1891. Log in to edit this section. 

Reminiscences of Jane Holloway (nee Tankard), grandmother of Jean Officer and related to her some years before her death in 1935. 


I was born in London within the sound of Bow Bells in 1839. When I was ten I went out to Australia with my Father and Mother and sisters. We landed in Geelong, and made our home in Melbourne in Swanston Street. The first thing I remember was Black Thursday, 1849, killing flies which had been driven in by the heat.
My father was originally intended for a C.of E. Clergyman, but could not accept all the views of the church so gave it up. He was always wanting to do things in a big way and when there was a shortage of chairs in Edinburgh he was the first to introduce cane chairs to Scotland which he ordered first from England, and afterwards made himself in a workshop. His partner, a Mr Ray, after they had sent for skilled workmen from England, gradually enticed them away and set up business for himself.
We went to a Miss James school at the top of Collins Street and when I was thirteen (1852) my sisters and I were sent to Tasmania to school, "Carrvilla", kept by the Rev James Price, now a cemetery. Every week we were driven to Launceston for music, there being no teacher at the school. The food was very bad, the bread was so heavy it would sink when soaked in tea; and the classes (repetition) were so long and we had to stand all the time, that I became so ill that the cook (not the principal) had to write to my mother and I was taken home.
After that I was sent to a Teacher's Training School near Spring Street and was a weekly boarder - 10/6 per week. Then I went to Miss Bennet's School at Kyneton as a pupil teacher and stayed for about two years. Saturdays we used to have great fun, charades etc. and dancing, and I was always in great demand at the piano. Miss Bennet had been adopted and brought up by a Countess and was a very fine woman, and she would often read to us while we were having meals etc.
My mother died when I was only twenty and I went as governess to Wickliffe (near Geelong) and travelled down in the coach with one of the Henty's of Portland. About that time we had staying with us a Maria James, a tiny little body but one safe cig with a beautiful voice that could fill the Exhibition with ease. She was also a wonderful pianist and organist and she went to Portland as a governess to the Henty's.
My father had a nice home in Auburn and I was living there with him and attended the Ball given in aid of the Benevolent Asylum when the first Exhibition Building (now the Mint)? was completed - my sister and I being dressed as flower girls.
I was married in 1862 to George Holloway and went to a cattle station about 100 miles from Bendigo. "Tragowell" was the name of the station. The train stopped at Bendigo and we went up in a gig from there. A week or two after we arrived pleuro broke out among the cattle and a veterinary surgeon came up to inoculate them and stayed several months. There were no neighbours about, and blacks came around occasionally asking for "baccy". Mr Argyle who came out in the same boat as my husband, he was the Shire Engineer at Kerang.
Before I was married, Bourke and Wills stayed at Tragowell on their ill fated expedition, and Wills played on the piano. When they went they left a camel behind, which eventually was sent to Reedy Lake. While at Tragowell seven of my children were born.
The Green's were at Mount Hope near Pyramid Hill and Mr McMillan owned Leaghur, Mr Cameron was at Lake Meren. In 1870 there was a big flood over Victoria, Kerang was flooded, and many residents came to us for shelter. When we went to Echuca we had to go part way by boat on account of the flood. The first Anglican Bishop, Bishop Perry, stayed with us when visiting Kerang - a real gentleman who brought books for the children.
Mr Chomley, manager of Mount Hope station came over and showed me how to use the first sewing machine I had.
Every week Cobb & Co's coach used to pass Tragowell on its way from Bendigo to Swan Hill. It used to change horses and leave the mail.
When my daughter Amy was a little girl, she took ill and was taken to Swan Hill by her Aunt Capron and father to consult Dr Gummow and drove all the way. Before we left Tragowell, Free Selection had begun and the selectors were beginning to come about.
One night Mr Holloway had come home late from town by coach and we heard a movement in the passage. I woke him with difficulty and we found a blackfellow had wandered into the children's nursery in search of him. He was in the DT's and thought the trees in the swamps were men chasing him. He was taken to the overseer, Mr Dunhill.
From Tragowell we went to Duck Swamp near Durham Ox Township. There were more children about and we used to attend church in town. Our first preacher was Rev James Taylor. He and his wife lived in a little cottage in the paddock in front of the homestead.
Rev DeGaris (father of C.J.) was also a resident minister and it was he who introduced the first irrigation scheme to the district. Mr Sheridan, a cabinet maker, also lived at Duck Swamp - a very useful man and a good local preacher. From there he went to Mildura.
The Bishops came to stay with us at Duck Swamp. Bishop Green, who came before the house was finished properly and had rather a disturbed night with the dogs and cats, was not a favourite. He denounced the people without knowing any thing of them. Bishop Moorehouse spent one night later on, on his way to Echuca. He was a fine gentleman, opp. to Bishop Green. Many other ministers visited us and many games of croquet were played on the lawn in front of our house. If it became too dark, candles were lit to continue the game by.
Just as the first church was being built and a minister chosen, the railway, which had been promised to Durham Ox, was withdrawn and taken to Pyramid Hill instead, causing a great set-back to the little town and many people left. Mr Holloway had started a Temperance Hotel and installed a manager before this; but when the general exodus took place it was closed down and he lost a good deal of money by it.
While we were at Duck Swamp, Mr Holloway bought Tyrrell Downs Station on Lake Tyrrell from Mr Salathiel Booth. I drove over with him to see it and the youngest baby went with me. The lake was a beautiful expanse of glittering salt surrounded by a sand like the beach and I was very anxious for a house to be built there. When it was time to go home we found the horses had broken loose, and I was left alone with the baby while my husband went in search of them. It was quite dark when he returned and I had made a bed for the baby under the trees.
We did not live there however. For time Mr Porter acted as manager, but it was after-wards sold to Lascelles and Co. At Duck Swamp we had an overseer who had a cottage to himself, a manager, many servants, and a men's cook. We had one sorrow here. My eldest boy eight years old stooped to get his boots from under the bed and knocked against the sharp iron, causing injuries to the spine from which he became paralysed and died.
In 1868 we moved to Boort Station near Boort Township. It had been owned before this by Mr Laidlaw, but had been managed for us by Mr Drake for some time. There was a tiny cemetery there where a child of Mr Godfrey was buried.
Bishop Moorehouse came up again and gave a lecture on irrigation in America. Then Mr De Garis left the church and gave up all his time to further the scheme. My three youngest children were born here.
Old Bill Jones, who had been at Boort for forty years, made all the bread which was beautiful, and he never had one failure, but no-one dared to go to the kitchen while it was being made! He afterwards went to Tyrrell, and died suddenly one day when standing at the door. Mr and Mrs Porter lived in a hut and Mr Porter used to come down and do the rest of the cooking. He also died while with us.
There was no church at Boort when we first went there and services were held at the little State School. The Methodist ministers would stay the night with us and we always had a good supper ready for them after the service.
On the 2nd May 1883 we had the first wedding in the family, my second daughter Amy being married to Mr Frank Russell, manager of the National Bank at Boort; from there he was transferred to Kerang. There was a large lake at Boort and it was a favourite spot for the children. It was full of dead trees at the time but now is being drained(?).
While at Boort we bought Tyntyndyer Station near Swan Hill and Mr Seward was sent to manage it, but things were not satisfactory. So we decided to leave Boort and go up ourselves, staying at Duck Swamp on the way.
Tyntyndyer had previously belonged to the Beveridge's who had first taken it up, and there is a grave of Andrew Beveridge, a son, who was killed by the blacks in 1846 when only twenty-four.
While there we had a French Tutor ME. Bourbon for the children. There had already been several governesses, also Mr Walker, who walked from Swan Hill when he first came. He belonged to a good family from England. As a young man he had been a student at Basbaden in Germany and got mixed up with military circles and was won over by the Germans. He was shot after the Great War, in France taking plans of the French fortresses for them.
Stanyer was the men's cook and a very good one. He took great interest in the family as he had been with us for years. Previously he had been a ploughman. We got lots of black ducks in those days and Stanyer could cook them to perfection.
The heat was very much greater in the Summer then and we were afflicted with far more mosquitoes, always having to sleep under mosquito nets and have big smoke fires. In those days the railway did not run to Swan Hill, only as far as Kerang. From there we had to come by coach or drive, a matter of forty miles. We often caught crayfish then, and Stanyer would spend his evenings fishing down by the river.
We stayed at Tyn. 'til about 1900 when we moved to Melbourne, leaving two of our sons in charge there. We lived at "Pine Hill" near Glenhuntly, a nice old place with pine trees. While there a fire broke out, but not much damage was done except to the back premises.
After several years we bought a house at Ormond and named it Tragowell after our old Station home. The train service then was very irregular. There were not many houses then but lots of paddocks. Now it is all changed.

(Information courtesy of Anne Holloway and Claire Monypenny great grand-daughters to Jane Holloway)

J Holloway of College Street Hawthorn

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This person used this address when signing the Women's Suffrage petition in 1891. Log in to edit this section.

J A Holloway of Harcourt

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M Holloway of Brunswick Road Brunswick

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M A Holloway of Glynwellyn

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Mrs Holloway of Brunswick Road Brunswick

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See the Editing Women's Petition information page for help on updating information and correcting transcription errors.

See the List of 1891 Women's Suffrage petition signatories for some other stories of these women.

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